Jeffrey Masten

Masten


Professor of English & Gender and Sexuality Studies

University Hall Room 308
Telephone: (847) 491-3012
Fax: (847) 467-1545
E-mail



Jeffrey Masten (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania) writes about and teaches early modern English literature and culture, Renaissance drama including Shakespeare, the history of sexuality and gender, textual editing, philology, and the history of authorship and collaboration.  He also teaches in the Gender & Sexuality Studies Program at Northwestern and is a former director of the program.

Masten has written Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, Authorship, and Sexualities in Renaissance Drama (Cambridge, 1997), and, with Peter Stallybrass and Nancy J. Vickers, co-edited Language Machines: Technologies of Literary and Cultural Production (Routledge, 1997). He edited the collaborative play The Old Law for the award-winning Oxford University Press Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works (2007).  His book Queer Philologies: Language, Sex, and Affect in Shakespeare's Time is forthcoming from the University of Pennsylvania Press, and he is editing a new critical edition of Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II for Arden Early Modern Drama. He published his discovery of a previously unknown first-edition copy of the play in TLS in 2012.

Masten was named Charles Deering McCormick Professor of Teaching Excellence by the university in 2006, and Herman and Beulah Pearce Miller Research Professor in Literature in 2009. He has served as a trustee of the Shakespeare Association of America, as chair of the Modern Language Association's Division on Shakespeare executive committee, and on the Advisory Committee for the journal PMLA.  He is the recipient of fellowships from the NEH, the Newberry Library, and the Folger Shakespeare Library, and has led a faculty-graduate seminar at the Folger Institute.

Prof. Masten earned his B.A. in English and Music at Denison University and has served on Denison’s Board of Trustees since 2010.


Publications by Jeffrey Masten

Books, Editions, and Collections

The Old Law The Old Law, by William Rowley, Thomas Middleton, and Thomas Heywood. An edition of the 1656 text, with critical introduction, innovative commentary and textual apparatus, and textual introduction, in Thomas Middleton: The Collected Works, general editor Gary Taylor. Additional materials in Thomas Middleton and Early Modern Textual Culture. Oxford University Press, 2007.

Language MachinesLanguage Machines: Technologies of Literary and Cultural Production. Selected papers from the 1995 English Institute. ed. with an introduction by Jeffrey Masten, Peter Stallybrass, and Nancy J. Vickers. Routledge, 1997.

Textual IntercourseTextual Intercourse: Collaboration, Authorship, and Sexualities in Renaissance Drama. Cambridge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture 14, general editor Stephen Orgel, Cambridge University Press, 1997.
* Excerpt reprinted in Reconceiving the Renaissance: A Critical Reader, ed. Ewan Fernie, Ramona Wray, Mark Thornton Burnett, and Clare McManus. Oxford University Press, 2005.

Articles

"Bound for Germany: Heresy, sodomy, and a new copy of Marlowe's Edward II."  Commentary. TLS: The Times Literary Supplement, Dec. 21 & 28, 2012, pp. 17-19.

"Glossing and Tupping: Editing Sex and Race in Othello." The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Embodiment: Gender, Sexuality, Race. ed. Valerie Traub. (Forthcoming, Oxford University Press)

"More or Less Queer." Shakesqueer: A Queer Companion to the Complete Works of Shakespeare. ed. Madhavi Menon. Duke University Press, 2010, pp. 309-18.

"Marlowe at the Edge," playnotes for the Chicago Shakespeare Theater at Navy Pier production of Christopher Marlowe's Edward II , fall 2008.

"Editing Boys: the Performance of Gender in Print." Redefining British Theatre History: from Performance to Print. ed. Peter Holland and Stephen Orgel. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006, pp. 113-34.

"Y2K, 2NK: Time for Kinsmen," playnotes for the Chicago Shakespeare Theater at Navy Pier production of The Two Noble Kinsmen, dir. Darko Tresnjak, fall 2006.

"Towards a Queer Address: the Taste of Letters and Early Modern Male Friendship." GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies 10:3 (2004): 367-84. Special issue in memory of Alan Bray, ed. Jody Greene.

"Material Cavendish: Paper, Performance, 'Sociable Virginity.'" MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly 65.1 (March 2004): 49-68. Special issue: "Feminism in Time," ed. Margaret Ferguson and Marshall Brown.

"The Two Gentlemen of Verona." A Companion to Shakespeare's Works, Volume III: The Comedies. ed. Jean E. Howard and Richard Dutton. Oxford: Blackwell, 2003, pp. 266-288.

"Living Arrangements, Writing Arrangements (Looking for Francis Beaumont)." The Elizabethan Theatre XV: Papers given at the Fifteenth and Sixteenth International Conferences on Elizabethan Theatre. ed. A. Lynne Magnusson and C. Edward McGee. Toronto: P.D. Meany, 2002, pp. 39-64.

"More or Less: Editing the Collaborative." Shakespeare Studies 29 (2001): 109-31.

"Ben Jonson's Head." Roundtable on "Material Cultures, ed. Peter Stallybrass. Shakespeare Studies 28 (2000): 160-168.

"The Interpretation of Dreams, c. 1610." Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and Early Modern Culture. ed. Carla Mazzio and Douglas Trevor. Routledge, 2000, pp. 157-185.

"A Modern Perspective," in William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona. Ed. Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine. The New Folger Library Shakespeare. New York: Washington Square Press, 1999, pp. 199-221.

"Pressing Subjects; Or, The Secret Lives of Shakespeare's Compositors." Language Machines: Technologies of Literary and Cultural Production. ed. Jeffrey Masten, Peter Stallybrass, and Nancy J. Vickers. Routledge, 1997, pp. 75-107.

"Playwrighting: Authorship and Collaboration." A New History of Early English Drama. ed. John D. Cox and David Scott Kastan. Columbia University Press, 1997, pp. 357-382.

"Is the Fundament a Grave?" The Body in Parts: Fantasies of Corporeality in Early Modern Europe. ed. David Hillman and Carla Mazzio. Routledge, 1997, pp. 128-145.

"Textual Deviance: Ganymede's Hand in As You Like It." Field Work: Sites in Literary and Cultural Studies. ed. Marjorie Garber, Paul B. Franklin, and Rebecca Walkowitz. Routledge, 1996, pp. 153-163.

"Family Values: Euthanasia, Editing, and The Old Law." Textual Practice 9.3 (1995): 445-458.

"My Two Dads: Collaboration and the Reproduction of Beaumont and Fletcher." Queering the Renaissance. ed. Jonathan Goldberg. Duke University Press, 1994, pp. 280-309.

"Beaumont and/or Fletcher: Collaboration and the Interpretation of Renaissance Drama." English Literary History 59 (1992): 337-356.
Reprinted in: Cardozo Arts and Entertainment Law Journal (special issue on "Intellectual Property and the Construction of Authorship") 10.2 (1992): 625-645.
Reprinted in: The Construction of Authorship: Textual Appropriation in Law and Literature. ed. Martha Woodmansee and Peter Jaszi. Duke University Press, 1994, pp. 361-381.

"'Shall I turne blabb?': Circulation, Gender, and Subjectivity in Wroth's Sonnets." Reading Mary Wroth: Representing Alternatives in Early Modern England. ed. Naomi J. Miller and Gary F. Waller. University of Tennessee Press, 1991, pp. 67-87.
Reprinted in: Early Women Writers 1600-1720. ed. Anita Pacheco. Longman Critical Readers Series. Addison Wesley Longman, 1997.


Renaissance Drama Journal

vol.28 (1997), "The Space of the Stage." ed. Jeffrey Masten and Wendy Wall. Northwestern University Press, 1999.

vol.29 (1998), "Dramas of Hybridity: Performance and the Body." ed. Jeffrey Masten and Wendy Wall. Northwestern University Press, 2000.

vol.30 (1999-2001), "Institutions of the Text." ed. Jeffrey Masten and Wendy Wall. Northwestern University Press, August 2001.

vol.31 (2002), "Performing Affect." ed. Jeffrey Masten and Wendy Wall. Northwestern University Press, August 2002.

vol.32 (2003), open topic. ed. Jeffrey Masten and Wendy Wall. Northwestern University Press, August 2003.

vol.33 (2004), open topic. ed. Jeffrey Masten and Wendy Wall. Northwestern University Press, 2004.

vol.34 (2005), "Media, Technology, and Performance." ed. W.B. Worthen, Wendy Wall, and Jeffrey Masten. Northwestern University Press, 2006.


Online Publications

"Gee, Your Heir Smells Terrific: Response to 'Shakespeare's Perfume,' by Richard Halpern." Early Modern Culture: an electronic seminar 2.

Introduction and contextual materials: Plays of Margaret Cavendish (1662 and 1668), Renaissance Women Online, Women Writers Project, Brown University, 1998.



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